Taos Revolt 1847


National Archives State History Lessons

With Story of Where, history comes to life for students when they’re able to stand on the exact location where history unfolded. By combining existing primary source materials and giving them geographic context, students are able to identify with the experience of the Taos Revolt.

A great example of this is the work by Lori Cox-Paul, an Education Specialist with the National Archives in Denver. She has created a number of state history lessons, including primary source materials.   At the 2014 National Council for History Education conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico, we selected the New Mexico lesson plan.   In addition to providing the primary source materials and historical context, these lessons map directly to the both the Common Core Standard as well as the New Mexico State Standards for History Education.

The slides below are taken from our 2014 NCHE presentation and show how an existing set of lessons on Expansion Era History can be enhanced with Story of Where. For this example, we have selected Lesson 1 – The Taos Revolt of 1847.

Common Core Standard for History

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Primary Source Material  – Taos Revolt 1847

The primary source materials from the Taos Revolt of 1847 include  a letter from Juan Antonio Garcia (undated).

By the order of Don Antonia Maria Trujillo the Inspector of Arms
I herewith send you this dispatch (or order) that the moment
this comes to hand you will raise all of the forces, together
with all the inhabitants that are able to bear arms Connecting
them also with persons in San Juan De los Caballeros by tomorrow
counting from the 22nd day of the present month and not later than
8 o’clock in the morning[.]
We have declared war with the American[s] and it is now
time that we all take our arms in our hands in defence [defense] of our
abandoned Country that we may try if possable [possible] to regain the
liberty of our unhappy Country[.]
You are held responsible [responsible] for the execution of the
above order[.]
Or you will be held responsible [responsible] if you fail in the
execution of the above order[.]
Juan Anto. [Antonio] Garcia
For: Sr. [Senor] Don. Pedro Vigil

Story of Where Tag  “Taos Revolt”

Using the Story of Where, a collection of related sites have been tagged ‘Taos Revolt’ and may be searched and the topics explored in the Story of Where  app.  The search reveals (3) heritage sites in the immediate Taos vicinity. Each heritage site includes a photo, description and history, including the relationship between the site and the Taos Revolt of 1847.

(i) Governor Bent’s Home

While serving as territorial governor during the Taos Revolt, Charles Bent was shot, scalped alive and assassinated by Pueblo attackers on January 19, 1847. The women and children in the Bent home were not harmed by the insurgents, and the remaining Bents fled to safety next door through a hole in the parlor wall.

(ii) Taos Pueblo

On the morning of January 19, 1847, the insurrectionists began the revolt in Don Fernando de Taos, present-day Taos, New Mexico. They were led by Pablo Montoya, a Mexican, and Tomás Romero, a Taos Pueblo also known as Tomasito (Little Thomas).

(iii) The Turley Mill Site.

The next day a large armed force of approximately 500 Mexicans and Pueblo attacked and laid siege to Simeon Turley’s mill in Arroyo Hondo, several miles outside of Taos. Charles Autobees, an employee at the mill, saw the men coming. He rode to Santa Fe for help from the occupying US forces. Eight to ten mountain men were left at the mill for defense. After a day-long battle, only two of the mountain men, John David Albert and Thomas Tate Tobin, Autobees’ half brother, survived. Both escaped separately on foot during the night.

 

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With Story of Where, history comes to life for students when they’re able to stand on the exact location where history unfolded. By combining existing primary source materials and giving them geographic context, students are able to identify with the experience of the Taos Revolt.